Have questions? See below for answers!

Do I have to have experience in Computer Science or coding to be successful in this training?

Absolutely not. Our trainings work from the bottom up, and are inclusive to every ability of educator. We encourage teachers that are new to the content area to apply, because the more the merrier in the CS world.

Is this training more than coding?

Yes. The Code.org curriculum focuses on a large spectrum of computer science skills. Courses include: programming, physical computing, HTML/CSS, and data. Students engage with computer science as a medium for creativity, communication, problem solving, and fun. The course inspires students as they build their own websites, apps, games, and physical computing devices. In later curriculum, students are asked to dive into how computing and technology can impact the world.

Is it really free?

Yes. All the training is completely free. Districts may be asked to contribute for teacher travel during the school year workshops, and the CSD course does require the purchase of Ada Fruit Boards to complete some of the course, but these products are subsidized to cut costs for districts.

Can I gain college or re-certification credit?


What is my time commitment?

One five day summer training and four days (two weekends) during the school year for teachers teaching Computer Science Discoveries (6th – 9th Grade) and Computer Science Principles (9th – 12th Grade). We are working to make the weekend trainings digital in order to cut down on travel and time in these states.

How long is the training for K-5 teachers?

One eight hour training and then you are good to go forth and be a Computer Science rockstar for your students.

Do I have to be a computer science teacher to teach these courses?

No. K-5 teachers have the opportunity to learn curriculum as a supplemental to their core courses. High School and Middle School teachers, depending on the state, can enter the program as a math, science or CTE educator. Please check with your state’s endorsement practices for specifics.

What is my commitment to the program?

To be accepted into the Teachers Teaching Tech program, the teacher must commit to teaching the computer science curriculum in the school year following their training and the teacher’s district leader must commit to allowing the teacher to add the class to the schedule.

What does it mean to be a facilitator?

Being a facilitator is an opportunity to take your enthusiasm for computer science, and using it to teach other educators. Facilitators travel to be trained with their cohort of teachers, and then will commit to being present at a summer workshops and weekend events to train other educators. Facilitators are compensated for their time.

Why should I sign up?

We believe that every student around the world should have the opportunity to learn computer science. It helps nurture problem-solving skills, logic, and creativity. This curriculum allows districts to move forward, giving their students the opportunity to access necessary skills and information to foundation for success in any 21st-century career path. Plus, it’s fun.